Mount Maroon

Mount Maroon

Most of our riding buddies were unavailable for the day, so the rest of us decided to climb a mountain instead.

Mount Maroon

Maroon is just under a thousand metres high.  We’ve ridden near it several times, but today we left the bikes at home, donned hiking boots and decided we’d see what it was like at the top.

Mount Maroon

The local Yuggera people called the mountain “Wahlmoorum” which was their name for the lace monitor lizard.  These voracious reptiles will devour anything smaller than themselves.  One fellow checked us out hungrily as we walked past.

Mount Maroon

We must not have looked very appetizing.  The hungry lizard let us pass by. Mount Maroon

The track quickly became steep.  The forest floor was covered with huge boulders.  We slowly made our way upwards.

Mount Maroon

Mount Maroon

Ahead of us stood the mountain’s sheer northern cliff-face.

We weren’t going to scale it.  Instead we’d be following the “Cottswold Track” up a gentler incline to the east.

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

Russel has climbed this mountain before.

“I think I remember a strange rock with a hole through the middle of it just up here.”

We took a short detour and there it was.

How odd.

Mount Maroon

After about half an hour of scrambling, the views behind us started to look impressive.

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

We paused at a rocky outcrop to survey the landscape to the north of us.

Mount Maroon

The walking track stopped at the “High Rockfall” warning sign.

We now had to start climbing.

Mount Maroon

We scrambled upwards…

Mount Maroon

…while others clambered down.

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

I’m not an experienced rock climber, but I didn’t feel unsafe.

I just took it slowly, one step at a time.

Mount Maroon

Our skyward scramble ended at a small forest nestled in the saddle between Maroon’s twin peaks.

Mount Maroon

I was surprised at the number of diverse environments on Maroon.  The landscape changed quickly.

Mount Maroon

Paul found a tree that he liked, and showed his affection.

Mount Maroon

Mount Maroon

We left the mountaintop forest and followed the rocky pavement up towards the summit.

Mount Maroon

On the way, Caro and I stopped to log a geocache.

Russel has been here before and had already signed the log book…

Mount Maroon

…so he admired the amazing views.

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

We continued the last few metres of the climb.

Mount Maroon

And then we were on top of the world.

Mount Maroon

Amazing views fell away beneath us in every direction.

Mount Maroon

We shared the summit with a few other climbers.

Mount Maroon

Some of us scurried around like ants on a giant pile of rocks.  Mount Maroon

Some of us just sat and absorbed the stunning beauty of the place.

Mount Maroon

Russel, our walking atlas, named all the peaks he could see.

He’s handy to have around at places like this 🙂

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

We reluctantly began our long trek back down Mount Maroon.

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

The morning’s adventure now unfolded in reverse.  We descended…

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

…while others climbed.

Mount Maroon

With sore feet and happy hearts we made our way back to the cars.

Total distance: 7.34 km
Max elevation: 971 m
Min elevation: 365 m
Total climbing: 758 m
Total descent: -728 m
Average speed: 2.99 km/h
Total time: 04:02:16
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We walked about eight kilometres in about four hours including breaks.

During that time we climbed about 650 metres in vertical ascent, and I burned about 2,000 kcal.

I’ll rate this hike 7 out of 10 on the tough-o-meter.  It was reasonably easy for someone with moderate fitness.  The only downside was that my legs ached for several days afterwards.

Thanks Russel, Paul and Caro for a fun day out.

Mount Maroon Mount Maroon Mount Maroon

Mount Maroon
(Photo: Russel Scholl)

 

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